Facts

Learn the Facts

GCT Global Container Terminals' Deltaport Berth Four (DP4) project is a smart, incremental and environmentally-conscious plan to add container terminal capacity at Roberts Bank in Delta, B.C. through the addition of a fourth berth to the existing GCT Deltaport Terminal.

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The Port of Vancouver's RBT2 plan includes a new Terminal island, built out in the ocean, on important Indigenous crabbing grounds. Its footprint? 164 hectares — a potentially significant loss of habitat.

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The Port of Vancouver is a government agency, the landlord and regulator of activities at Roberts Bank. Their approach to this project may put businesses and taxpayers at risk.

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RBT2 will cost between $2.5 and $3.5 Billion — making it the most expensive port expansion ever in Canada. Some estimates put the costs even higher. Those high costs could be passed on to importers and exporters and make our gateway less competitive.

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Migratory shorebirds, including the Western Sandpiper, depend on biofilm for essential nutrition and Environment and Climate Change Canada estimated that the RBT2 project's residual adverse impacts on biofilm are "potentially high in magnitude, permanent, irreversible, and, continuous."

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Deltaport Berth 4 is a smart, phased, environmentally-conscious expansion of the existing Terminal footprint. Its footprint? 56 hectares — roughly a third of the size of RBT2.

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Global Container Terminals is a private-sector company, fully committed to the Canadian Deltaport Project, creating no risk for taxpayers.

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Deltaport Berth 4 is a smart, phased plan, delivering needed capacity at lower cost, between $1 and $1.6 billion.

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GCT's Deltaport Berth 4 expansion is proposed on the east side of the existing Roberts Bank causeway, where almost no biofilm has been identified.

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GCT Global Container Terminals is looking for a fair process. The company has history in Delta and proven ability to deliver effective and environmentally-conscious port expansions and sustainable operations.

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A smart, phased approach that expands the existing footprint over time can provide the right type of port capacity at the right time.

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From its previous successful expansions, GCT Global Container Terminals knows open dialogue with the community, local Indigenous peoples, supply chain partners, and the workforce is essential to delivering and improving the project.

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Unfortunately, the Port of Vancouver, GCT's landlord and regulator, has been obstructing consideration of any alternative project except its own flawed Terminal 2 project.

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Building RBT2 a big new terminal island is not only hugely expensive and potentially environmentally harmful, it may also create overcapacity in the short-term, with less flexibility to adapt to uncertain future market conditions.

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RBT2 is being challenged by local communities, environmental and Indigenous groups. Their concerns relate to migratory shorebirds, crab and fish habitat, and impacts on biofilm, and orca populations. Many feel they are not being heard, and that the process is moving too quickly.